Hello? Are there any listeners out there?

Two topics examine 2 audio techniques that try to answer the question, ‘are there any listeners out there?’

By Geoff Esdaile | Content Creator‍‍

So much of what we create in audio comes down to one thing, how does it affect the listener? A business wants reassurance that their message no matter how it’s delivered is affecting listeners in a positive way that will turn into dollars.

Today’s two topics examine 2 audio techniques that try to answer the question, ‘are there any listeners out there’ and how can my message affect them.

 

The first is “Are testimonials believable”?

And the second is “When two people are talking in a commercial does that mean everyone is listening?”

 

Testimonials are statements from customers telling your audience your business is great and who doesn’t want that? The affect you want is trust.  

 

When two people are talking in a commercial the affect you want is also trust but there’s something else too, humanity. The listener wants to hear their troubles,their problems and then, the discovery of a solution. In this case the affect you want is a short hand version of ‘this business knows what I’m going through’.

 

Unfortunately,we’ve all heard the poorly constructed unbelievable versions. So, here’s some ideas to improve the effect on the listener.

 

Testimonials work best when they move away from the general towards the specific. Avoid using‘the staff were friendly’ or ‘the service was great’ and   towards specific examples of when, where and why the staff or the service was a stand out.

 

Next,encourage testimonials that begin with a problem and end with a solution. For example – “my pool filter didn’t work, I tried everyone then I went to…”

Or “my car kept making the same weird sound and I couldn’t find anyone who knew how to fix it then I went to…”

Again,this is using a specific example but also the application of the product inaction.

 

Surprise the standard expectations of the listener within the testimonial

 

The last point is the element of surprise. Surprise the standard expectations of the listener within the testimonial “I didn’t expect that” or  “That’s different from everyone else“ or “I didn’t think these guys couldn’t help but then…”

 

Now, I know what you’re thinking business owners can’t control testimonials. Well? I disagree. You can create in-store or online feedback forms or surveys, do follow up calls or automated emails and using reviews from a neutral space like Google to your advantage.

 

And speaking of Google, here’s a link about getting more results from your Google Reviews.

https://www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2020/09/16/get-more-google-reviews

 

 

Everything they want to say is in their ad. But is anyone listening, remembering, trusting and acting on that busy crowded message?

 

 

 

OK,let’s move on to “When two people are talking is anyone listening”

 

Many business owners write for themselves or want creative writers to use ‘two people talking’. Undeniably it’s a great way of getting information across. The address, opening hours, phone numbers and a shopping list of services, it’s all there. The business owner can feel very proud everything they want to say is in their ad. But is anyone listening, remembering, trusting and acting on that busy crowded message?    

 

The short answer is NO… not in that form.

 

 

To be clear it looks/sounds a little like this.

 

Fvo1:“Hi Julie”
Fvo2:“Hi Ange. I’m glad I ran into you I’ve got a question about your air-conditioner”
 
Fvo1:“Air-conditioner? – what do you mean”?
Fvo2:“We’re thinking of getting one – so who did you get yours from?”
 
Fvo1:“Simple Air” – the price was great, installation took less than a few hours,the installers were so friendly and quick and best of all, it came with a 24-monthwarranty. Not to mention there’s a help desk line we can call with any questions.
 
Fvo2:Well, I’ve got one – how do I contact them?
Fvo1:Easy w w w simple air dot com dot au  
 
Fvo2:simple air dot com dot au – now that is simple
Fvo1&Fvo2:(both women laugh)

The short answer is NO… not in that form.

But if you do take the approach, here's 3 tips to improve its effectiveness.

 

Leave the entire list of what you do to your website. This is the place to immerse the listener in your full range of services. Use your audio message to cover one thing very well.

 

Leave room in your audio for the two actors to add our very human tendency of‘ums’…’ahhs’ or ‘ohhh, yeah’. And let’s not forget silence as the most effective sound effect there is.

Like negative space on a billboard or in good graphic design, space or silence can emphasize the point you’re making

 

And finally, don’t have your voice talent agreeing with each other because in real life we don’t. Conflict is key to drama and it also provides the opportunity to then resolve it and make the business the star.    

 

you have to get them to trust you

 

Always remember… there’s a human being at the end of your message and if you want them to listen and act upon your point of view, you have to get them to trust you and that is the greatest effect audio can have.  

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